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Asian Community Development Corporation (Jacquie L. Kay) records

 Collection
Identifier: M202

Scope and Content Note

Comprised of documents gathered by Neil Chin and Jacquie Kay, the collection demonstrates the non-profit community organization Asian Community Development Corporation's (ACDC) scope of concern in the development of affordable housing and assistance for small business development, education, and job training for Asian-Americans in oversaturated urban areas. These papers highlight ACDC's plans to develop new sites and implement new services to assist low-income residents in Chinatown. The majority of the collection documents two ACDC development projects: Oak Terrace (Parcel R3/R3A), and The Metropolitan (Parcel C). Documents related to these projects include funding reports, limited partnership agreements, project status reports, design specifications, and lease agreements. The collection also contains ACDC meeting minutes and notes relating to the annual Board of Directors' meeting, financial documents, newsletters and other publications, membership lists, correspondence, and two copies of a 2000 Chinatown Master Plan report.

Dates

  • 1962-2010

Creator

Language of Materials

Collection is predominantly in English, with some materials in Chinese.

Conditions Governing Access:

The collection is unrestricted.

Conditions Governing Reproduction and Use:

Copyright restrictions may apply.

Historical Note

The Asian Community Development Corporation (ACDC) was created to fill the need for an entity focused on the affordable housing needs of the Boston Chinatown community. In 1987, Tunney Lee, Jacquie Kay and Lawrence Cheng formulated the concept for a new community development corporation (based primarily on Jacquie Kay's board participation with the Chinese Economic Development Council, 1975-1984). Kay and Lee proceeded to build a community board and acquire funds for the development of the organization through the Riley Foundation. Lee would serve on the initial board before stepping away after a year, while Kay became the Board Chair and President for the next 16 years, leading the two affordable housing development efforts, Oak Terrace and the Metropolitan. During Kay's tenure, Executive Directors included Regina Lee, Carol Lee, and Bruce Pulleyblank, while board members included Neil Chin, Jeffrey Wong, Carol Thomas, Alma Armstrong, Caroline Chang, Paul Lee, Joseph Chow, Mary Soohoo, Nick Chau, and Harry Yee. The first new construction project in Chinatown in over two decades, Oak Terrace filled a pressing need for affordable housing in the most densely populated section of Boston. Completed in 1995, Oak Terrace consists of 88 units of housing, the majority of which are available to low and moderate income residents. Following the project's completion, ACDC shifted its focus to a new, larger development project located on Parcel C in Chinatown—The Metropolitan. The Parcel C site was connected to a long history of community activism. Designated by the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA) for use as a community center in the 1980's, Parcel C became the center of a protest movement following the BRA's decision to sell the plot to the New England Medical Center in 1993. Fearing a proposed eight story parking garage's impact on the Chinatown community's social and environmental fabric, the Coalition to Protect Parcel C for Chinatown rallied local residents and activists (including ACDC board members) to block the sale of the site. Faced with overwhelming community opposition, the Medical Center would withdraw its garage proposal in 1994. The Metropolitan was completed on the site in 2004, with 46% of its 251 housing units affordable to low and moderate income families. ACDC would go on to develop other properties both within and outside of Chinatown, including 6 Fort St, Quincy (2011) and One Greenway (2015).Jacquie L. Kay was born and raised in Seattle, Washington. Her work in economic development began in the early 1960's, when she served on the founding board of the International District Improvement Council (InterIm). As a third-generation Chinese-American, she has been deeply engaged in economic development work in Seattle, New York, and Boston. From 1973-2009 she was president of WPI, Inc., a global economic training and development company based in Cambridge, MA. She went on to MIT where she was a Fellow, Lecturer, and Research Associate focusing on the nexus of community, financing, and sustainability (energy and the environment). She taught in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning, looking at the connections between communities, financing, and energy and the environment. In 2012, she formed the Sun Walking Group, an innovative business model focusing on providing a platform for ideas, start-ups, and projects utilizing resilience and adaptation tools.

Chronology

  • 1987 ACDC founded by Jacquie Kay, Tunney Lee and other Asian-American community activists.
  • 1987 ACDC wins the right to develop Parcel R3/R3A on Washington St. in Chinatown
  • 1993-1994 The Coalition to Protect Parcel C for Chinatown successfully opposes New England Medical Center's parking garage proposal for Parcel C.
  • 1995 Oak Terrace opens on Parcel R3/R3A site with 88 units of affordable housing.
  • 2004 The Metropolitan completed on Parcel C with 251 units of housing, 46% designated for low/moderate income families.
  • 2011 Opening of 6 Fort St. Quincy, with 34 units of housing
  • 2015 One Greenway completed with 363 units of housing, 40% designated for low/moderate income families.
1987
ACDC founded by Jacquie Kay, Tunney Lee and other Asian-American community activists.
1987
ACDC wins the right to develop Parcel R3/R3A on Washington St. in Chinatown
1993-1994
The Coalition to Protect Parcel C for Chinatown successfully opposes New England Medical Center's parking garage proposal for Parcel C.
1995
Oak Terrace opens on Parcel R3/R3A site with 88 units of affordable housing.
2004
The Metropolitan completed on Parcel C with 251 units of housing, 46% designated for low/moderate income families.
2011
Opening of 6 Fort St. Quincy, with 34 units of housing
2015
One Greenway completed with 363 units of housing, 40% designated for low/moderate income families.

Extent

1.35 cubic feet (2 containers)

Overview

The Asian Community Development Corporation (ACDC) was founded in 1987 by Jacquie Kay, Tunney Lee, and other Asian American activists with the goal of addressing the affordable housing needs of the Boston Chinatown community. During Kay's 16 year tenure as Board Chair and President, the organization oversaw two affordable housing developments—Oak Terrace (1995), and The Metropolitan (2004), which together made over 330 units of housing available to the Chinatown community. The Metropolitan site is of particular historical import. Formerly known as Parcel C, the site was the focus of intense community activism in 1993-1994 following a proposal to build an eight-story parking garage in a residential section of Chinatown. The garage proposal was withdrawn in 1994, and the site's connection to community organizations continues today. In addition to its housing units, the Metropolitan is home to the offices of ACDC, the Boston Chinatown Neighborhood Center, the Chinese Progressive Association, and Boston Asian: Youth Essential Services.

Overview

The collection highlights ACDC's plans to develop new sites and implement new services to assist low-income residents in Chinatown. The majority of the collection documents two ACDC development projects: Oak Terrace (Parcel R3/R3A), and The Metropolitan (Parcel C). Documents related to these projects include funding reports, limited partnership agreements, project status reports, design specifications, and lease agreements. The collection also contains ACDC meeting minutes and notes relating to the annual Board of Directors' meeting, financial documents, newsletters and other publications, membership lists, correspondence, and two copies of a 2000 Chinatown Master Plan report.

System of Arrangement:

Arranged in one alphabetical sequence by subject.

Physical Location

38/1

Immediate Source of Acquisition:

Received from Jacquie L. Kay on December 4, 2014.

Bibliography

  • Kay, Jacquie. Email message to author. November 11, 2015.
  • Leong, Andrew. “The Struggle Over Parcel C: How Boston's Chinatown Won a Victory in the Fight Against Institutional Expansionism and Environmental Racism” (1997). Institute for Asian American Studies Publications, Paper 22. Accessed December 2, 2015. http://scholarworks.umb.edu/iaas_pubs/22/.
  • “Real Estate.” Asian Community Development Corporation. Accessed December 2, 2015. http://www.asiancdc.org/content/real-estate
Title
Finding aid for the Asian Community Development Corporation (Jacquie L. Kay) Records
Author
Finding aid prepared by Andrew Begley
Date
December 10, 2015
Language of description
Description Is In English

Repository Details

Part of the Northeastern University Archives and Special Collections Repository

Contact:
92 Snell Library
Northeastern University
360 Huntington Avenue
Boston MA 02115 US